NAPLAN testing takes final step to online

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More than one million students will take part in the latest round of annual NAPLAN testing and for the first time, all the assessments will be conducted online.

Students in years 3, 5, 7, and 9 will sit the national literacy and numeracy test across 9500 schools and campuses across Australia, and the move to online testing will benefit pupils, according to the Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority.

“NAPLAN online is a better, more precise assessment that is more engaging for students,” authority CEO David de Carvalho said.

“The tailored testing means students are given questions that are better suited to their abilities, so they can show what they know and can do.

“NAPLAN online also has a variety of accessibility adjustments, so that students with diverse capabilities, learning needs and functional abilities are able to participate.”

The test helps to determine whether young Australians are reaching important literacy and numeracy benchmarks using a national, objective scale.

It will move from May to March in 2023, giving education authorities access to results earlier in the year.

“These changes mean the valuable NAPLAN data will be more useful to teachers, schools and education authorities,” Mr de Carvalho said.

“This year’s test is particularly important so that we can add to a national data set and continue getting insight into the impact the (COVID-19) has had after two years of disruptions to schooling.

“The last two years have been challenging for schools, parents and students, with disruptions such as lockdowns, floods and COVID cases keeping students out of the classrooms at times.”

Mibenge Nsenduluka
(Australian Associated Press)

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